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The High Life

The views are money. And they cost a lot of it.

One day, when the regular postal worker for 360 Market Square was off-duty, a sub delivered Walt Hughes’s $50,000 Rolex to the wrong mailbox—and couldn’t remember which one. The good Samaritan returned it within an hour, before a building email could go out. For all 360’s bougie trappings, like a concierge who once worked at the Pretty Woman hotel and a skydeck with full-circle views, the people at 360 are down-to-earth, Hughes says, and that’s what he loves most about the place. “I had my guard up at first,” he says, “but I’ve met really good friends here.” They’re also dog people, like him. Pet parents bond, and retirees like to walk people’s dogs.


360 Market Square
360 E. Market St.
Management Flaherty & Collins Properties
Size 292 units
Parking $125 per garage spot
Walk Score 93
Price 2/2s start at $2,500 per month and increase based on floor plan
Rent starts at $1,400 for a studio, easily hits $5,000 for a two-bedroom on a high floor, and tops out at $7,000 for a two-bedroom penthouse. Everything about 360 screams hashtag goals, particularly Hughes’s pad, a 16th-floor unit with a view right down Market Street to Monument Circle. Hughes has been in the building since day one and was waiting for one of these apartments to open up. The view puts the rent at $4,000 per month. Rent fluctuates based on the apartment’s floor, view, and layout. As a rule of thumb, it increases $75 per floor for the same floor plan. The building’s curved shape creates oddly sized rooms.
The tower, risen from the ashes of Market Square Arena, sits on a citified block with a plethora of services, but life at 360 is pretty complete under its own roof.

A tall, all-glass apartment building.

The property has quickly leased up to about 80 percent occupancy. Some floor plans have a wait list.Tony Valainis

The fifth floor is dedicated to deluxe amenities, including a massive gym with Life Fitness equipment, office space, a conference room, lounge areas, and a sleek pool with a tanning shelf. For dogs, there’s a fully stocked washroom that feels like a salon, and a fenced park with equipment for off-leash play. The 24/7 concierges sometimes bring in restaurants to cater a spread.

One downside? Some residents say the walls are thin. But there’s no noise from the outside. “I feel like I’m in the metropolis,” says Hughes, “but once I’m in my unit, I don’t hear the city.”

Is the building social? A lot of cool things pop up. Fogo de Chao had a summer barbecue for the residents last year. It’s stuff like that you don’t see everywhere. Favorite food delivery service? Postmates. The concierge turned me onto this when I wanted heavy-duty barbecue. They deliver from King Ribs. What is downtown missing? A dog park.

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