Hey, Andrew Luck! The Kids Wanna Know …

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Students at St. Richard’s Episcopal School asked Andrew Luck and Riley Hospital’s Change the Play medical consultants to pass along good advice about health and nutrition.

Andrew Luck and doctors from IU Health went back and forth with students from St. Richard's Episcopal School.
Andrew Luck and doctors from IU Health went back and forth with students from St. Richard’s Episcopal School.

Photo by Tony Valainis

 

Q: What games did you play when you were young?

LUCK: I played a lot of sports—soccer, track, basketball, baseball, football. My sisters and I made up games, too. That’s a fun way to mix things up and learn to create rules.

1114-jeffsperringTHE DOC SAYS: “It’s just as important to get outside, move around, or go for walks and hikes with your family as it is to play sports.” —Jeff Sperring, M.D.

 

Q: How do you relax?

LUCK: I chill out by reading or watching a documentary. I also like to vacuum on my day off!

 

» VIDEO: See the kids interview Luck.

 Video by Darryl Smith

 

Q: What’s your favorite healthy snack?

LUCK: I eat trail mix every day before practice.

1114-karenwheelerTHE DOC SAYS: “You want after-school snacks that give you long-burning fuel. Things that are made from white flour and sugar won’t give you lasting energy. Try peanut butter on whole-wheat bread, a piece of fruit, and milk for protein.” —Karen Wheeler, M.D.

 

Q: How did you balance sports and education?

LUCK: Getting our homework done was the number-one priority. Maybe you can spend 30 minutes right after school to start your homework before practice. Also, sleeping enough is important so you won’t be tired throughout the afternoon.

 

Q: How many hours do you sleep each night?

LUCK: Nine or 10. I’m a sucker for sleep! I read a book before going to sleep instead of using my iPad.

 

Q: How do you prepare for college sports?

LUCK: Focus on academics, get out in the community to help out, and have fun with it. I made sure to enjoy my sports. And it never hurts, when you get a little older, to write a coach and ask what they look for in an athlete.

1114-caltoumTHE DOC SAYS: “If you get hurt, take adequate time off. Rest your body. If your body hurts, it’s telling you something, and you need to get over that to get to the next level.” —Christine Caltoum, M.D.

 

Q: How many push-ups can you do in a minute?

LUCK: Hopefully 35! I’m not very good at push-ups. I lost to my girlfriend in a push-up competition in college.

 

1114-luck.kids
Working with students like the ones from St. Richard’s Episcopal School is child’s play, says Luck.

Photo by Tony Valainis

 

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