Seven Adult Summer Camps

Where to sign up for the biggest trend in active travel.

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Flag football and climbing towers aren’t just for reluctant kids anymore. Adult summer camps have sprouted up all over the country—and there’s an option for every type. From getaways in the woods to educational programs to a weekend of open bars and dance parties, there are sleepaway camps right here in Indiana and within a day’s drive to help you forget about adulting for a while.

Wanderlust camp

Photo by Ali Kaukas

Wanderlust Festivals

Bondville, Vermont

June 16-19

$15 for single classes or $465 for four days

Who it’s for: The yogi. Wanderlust offers the chance to step back from life and spend a weekend finding your inner Zen. With meditation, yoga classes, and hikes in the mountains, Wanderlust goers can unplug from life and tune into inner peace. All-day outdoor music, organic farm-fresh foods, and even a lecture series ranging from holistic health to politics are just a few of the things this ommm-azing festival offers.

 

Adult Space Academy

Huntsville, Alabama

July 1-3, July 8-10, August 26-28, September 2-5

$499 for three days, $599 for four days

Who it’s for: Virgin Galactic dreamers. With interactive space-mission simulations, model rockets, classroom lessons on current NASA initiatives, and an anti-gravity chair that mimics walking on the moon, you can train like the astronaut you thought you’d become when you were 10.

 

Adult Band Camp

Interlochen, Michigan

August 9-14

$525

Who it’s for: Band parents. This instructional (indoor) program at the prestigious Interlochen Center for the Arts, near Traverse City, whips students into shape for an end-of-camp performance. If you’re not as good as you once were, don’t worry. As long as you’ve had serious experience with a concert band instrument, you’re in. All spots for flutes, oboes, and trumpets are full, though—so clarinet and sax players, sign up soon.

 

Mickeys Camp
Mickey’s Camp

Mickey’s Camp

Bradford Woods, Martinsville, Indiana

August 15-17 (women), August 17-19 (men)

$1,500

Who it’s for: The partied-out. Predating the recent trend, Mickey’s Camp has an established reputation as a knowledge-rich weekend getaway for people who have been adults for a while (with the disposable income to show for it). Instead of alcohol-induced dance parties, campers can take a bourbon-tasting class. Or any of the other 50 sessions taught by experts. Campers can still experience the great outdoors with the nearby lake and nature.

 

Camp No Counselors
Camp No Counselors

Photo courtesy Camp No Counselors

Camp No Counselors

Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin

August 25-28

$575-$599

Who it’s for: Social Millennials. In addition to the expected sleepaway camp experiences like kayaking and archery, Camp No Counselors, which became the poster child for this trend after the founders appeared on Shark Tank, takes summer fun to a Greek Row level with color wars, slip and slides, and tubing. Enjoy the Bloody Mary and mimosa bar at breakfast, beer and wine at lunch, and a full-service open bar in the evenings. Campers will also enjoy themed costume parties and music provided by up-and-coming artists and popular DJs. And did we mention there’s booze?

 

Camp Forever Fun

Reading, Michigan

September 2-5

$299 per ticket, $999 for four tickets

Who it’s for: The Gnaw Bone alum. You can relive the purest summers of your tween years at Camp Forever Fun, close to the Indiana-Michigan state line, but this time with craft beer (the camp is sponsored by Short’s Brewing Company). Featuring hiking, a foam-and-bubbles dance party, a giant swing, a high ropes course, arts and crafts, color wars, a water trampoline, stargazing, making s’mores, and much more, the activities are designed for nature-side relaxation with new friends and a keg.

 

Camp Kitigin
Camp Kitigin

Camp Kitigin

West Branch, Michigan

September 16-18

$200

Who it’s for: The workaholic. There’s no Wi-Fi at Camp Kitigin, located in north-central Michigan. Campers are sent back to their childhoods—with journals and disposable cameras—to spend a weekend outdoors with zero screen time. With archery, canoeing, zip-lining, and a climbing tower, you can find the kid in you who didn’t need a smartphone to function.

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